Driver shortage mythical OOIDA says

The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) is taking aim at what it refers to as the “mythical” truck driver shortage in a letter to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Lewie Pugh, OOIDA’s executive vice-president, Driver Shortage 'Mythical' OOIDA Says

Lewie Pugh, OOIDA’s executive vice-president, wrote that more than 400,000 commercial licenses are issued a year

Lewie Pugh, OOIDA’s executive vice-president, wrote that more than 400,000 commercial licenses are issued a year, and cited a U.S. Department of Labor finding that high turnover at large carriers was one of the reasons behind a perceived shortage.

The letter came in the wake of the International Trade Administration’s Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness’ call for the department to “take a leadership role to coordinate federal agencies to immediately address the driver shortage that threatens the effectiveness of the nation’s critical supply chains.”

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“For decades, our country’s largest motor carriers and the trade associations that represent them have perpetuated the myth of a driver shortage to promote policies that maintain the cheapest labor supply possible,” Pugh said.

Some areas that need urgent attention from federal regulators and lawmakers include increasing truck parking capacity, providing fair levels and methods of compensation, repealing the exemption that denies truckers guaranteed overtime pay, better truck driver training programs, and eliminating excessive detention time, Pugh said.



“Addressing these inefficiencies will repair supply chain vulnerabilities in a far more sustainable manner than simply allowing more drivers to enter the industry,’’ Pugh said.

Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association, Driver Shortage 'Mythical' OOIDA Says

Some areas that need urgent attention from federal regulators and lawmakers include increasing truck parking capacity, providing fair levels and methods of compensation, repealing the exemption that denies truckers guaranteed overtime pay, better truck driver training programs, and eliminating excessive detention time

OOIDA voiced those opinions during a round-table discussion in July with the secretaries of U.S. Department of Transportation and Department of Labor, which focused on best practices to prioritize retention and limit turnover.

“The Department of Commerce, along with the administration’s supply chain disruptions task force, must prioritize resolving the underlying circumstances that have led to excessive churn. Otherwise, we anticipate turnover rates will remain precariously high or even increase no matter how many new drivers are eligible to enter the industry,” Pugh said.Fsuppl

OOIDA represents 150,000 members.


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